Coaching: the Best Kept Secret as an Entrepreneur

Coaching: The Best-Kept Secret to Growing as an Entrepreneur

A good coach can turn raw talent into refined expertise and refined talent into renowned success. But how do we bridge “the coaching gap”?
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Sometimes, a change at the top can be the difference between a perennial loser and a surprise contender. For proof, look no further than the Los Angeles Rams, a team which less than a year ago wrapped up a 4-12 season that included a midyear coaching transition.

New coach Sean McVay appears to have energized his players, helping the Rams capture momentum that was completely absent when the team lost seven consecutive games to close out the 2016 season.

And the news there is good: Due to the competitive advantages entrepreneurs enjoy from expert coaching, the marketplace for coaches has started to swell. According to the 2016 Global Coaching study by the International Coach Federation and PricewaterhouseCoopers, global coaching revenue was estimated to be about $2.4 billion in 2015, besting 2011’s figure by a substantial 19 percent.

Not to mention what’s happening with the bigger guys: Up to 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies now work with executive coaches, according to consulting firm Hay Group.

Yet, while executive coaching has gained traction, many startup founders lack access to high-quality coaches. The paradox? They can’t afford an experienced coach, but need one to be able to build their companies to the point of being able to do just that.

What separates a coach from a mentor

posted about this coaching paradox on LinkedIn a while back, and my post attracted a flood of comments. After reading them through, I realized that many people don’t understand the distinction between a mentor and a coach. While these positions might seem similar, there’s actually a world of difference between the two.

“Mentors,” for one thing, don’t usually follow a fixed schedule or require payment. They help with strategic issues, answering questions for founders without actively participating in company operations.

“Coaches,” on the other hand, are not afraid to get their hands dirty. They are typically paid, and operate on, a fixed schedule to help entrepreneurs make themselves better. Mentors offer great advice; coaches ask great questions.

Based on the comments my post attracted, founders of new startups are hungry for a coach. There’s a huge gap in the startup community as it relates to coaching; everyone needs it, but relatively few people are willing to provide it for free. So, what to do?

How to bridge entrepreneurship’s coaching gap

The question is, how do we solve the paradox and match enterprising, young CEOs with talented coaches? The answer to this coaching quandary rests in the basic ecology of entrepreneurship. By studying the interactions between entrepreneurs and their physical environment, a cycle of mutually beneficial coaching exchanges begins to emerge. Here are its three steps:

1. First-time founders: Barter for coaches. Young founders probably can’t afford to shell out more than $1 million a year for coaching sessions with Tony Robbins. Instead, they must find coaches willing to offer their services for a low cost. They also might be able to trade their own services for coaching.

My first coach, James, was also one of my clients when I was running my first company in Ohio. James was a sales coach who asked us to build his new website. When I initially met with him to discuss the project, I accidentally went to the wrong Starbucks. I arrived 15 minutes late for our meeting, which prompted his first lesson: “Be on time when you meet with people. You’re young, and you need to do the little things to ensure that others take you seriously and treat you as a professional.”

Buyer Behavior Concepts and Marketing Strategy

Buyer Behavior Concepts and Marketing Strategy

by Neil Kokemuller

Buyer behavior is the systematic approach consumers follow when entering the purchase process and making buying decisions. The step-by-step consumer decision-making process, along with common modes of decision-making are both useful when developing marketing strategies.

Need Recognition

The first step in the consumer buying process is need recognition. This is the point at which a consumer becomes aware of a functional or emotional need. Within your marketing strategy, it is common to include emphasis on stimulating need awareness to funnel buyers in your brand’s direction. Restaurant commercials discussing the human sensation of hunger and then presenting visual imagery of food offerings are trying to provoke viewers to connect the need for food to the restaurant experience. Similarly, direct marketing and personal selling strategies are useful in getting in front of customers and drawing out need recognition.

Information Search

Once consumers realize a need exists, they develop a consideration set and begin to compare options on important criteria. This is a key stage for marketers that want to persuade buyers that their solution offers the best value for a given need. Marketing plans include formulation of a positioning strategy. This is the distinct image you create with target customers emphasizing why your benefits are superior to competing options. In highly competitive markets, effective positioning and brand development is critical in affecting customers during search processes.

 

Purchase and Experience

Customer retention and loyalty are critical in marketing strategies for companies looking to long-term success. Thus, providing a strong point-of-purchase experience that includes warranties, deliveries, installations and effective follow-through on support promises is integral to marketing. Also, during the buying process implementation step, following up with reinforcement advertising, loyalty programs and add-on selling efforts help build loyalty and increased revenue from customers.

Decision Modes

Based on a combination of level of importance and level of experience in a purchase situation, buyers generally enter a decision from one of four perspectives: extended problem solving, limited problem solving, habitual buying or brand loyalty. Marketing strategies in competitive, big ticket categories typically deal with extended problem solving. This means customers actively research and seek lots of information on options and benefits. Limited problem solving includes less risky purchases or everyday items. Quick-hitting, visual messages are more common. Companies often use loyalty programs to maintain relationships with core, loyal customers. The habitual buyers purchase a particular brand routinely, without conscious thought. They are a battleground for both the brand being purchased and competitors trying to influence with a stronger value proposition.

Buyer behavior is the systematic approach consumers follow when entering the purchase process and making buying decisions. The step-by-step consumer decision-making process, along with common modes of decision-making are both useful when developing marketing strategies.

Need Recognition
The first step in the consumer buying process is need recognition. This is the point at which a consumer becomes aware of a functional or emotional need. Within your marketing strategy, it is common to include emphasis on stimulating need awareness to funnel buyers in your brand’s direction. Restaurant commercials discussing the human sensation of hunger and then presenting visual imagery of food offerings are trying to provoke viewers to connect the need for food to the restaurant experience. Similarly, direct marketing and personal selling strategies are useful in getting in front of customers and drawing out need recognition.

Information Search
Once consumers realize a need exists, they develop a consideration set and begin to compare options on important criteria. This is a key stage for marketers that want to persuade buyers that their solution offers the best value for a given need. Marketing plans include formulation of a positioning strategy. This is the distinct image you create with target customers emphasizing why your benefits are superior to competing options. In highly competitive markets, effective positioning and brand development is critical in affecting customers during search processes.

Purchase and Experience
Customer retention and loyalty are critical in marketing strategies for companies looking to long-term success. Thus, providing a strong point-of-purchase experience that includes warranties, deliveries, installations and effective follow-through on support promises is integral to marketing. Also, during the buying process implementation step, following up with reinforcement advertising, loyalty programs and add-on selling efforts help build loyalty and increased revenue from customers.

Decision Modes
Based on a combination of level of importance and level of experience in a purchase situation, buyers generally enter a decision from one of four perspectives: extended problem solving, limited problem solving, habitual buying or brand loyalty. Marketing strategies in competitive, big ticket categories typically deal with extended problem solving. This means customers actively research and seek lots of information on options and benefits. Limited problem solving includes less risky purchases or everyday items. Quick-hitting, visual messages are more common. Companies often use loyalty programs to maintain relationships with core, loyal customers. The habitual buyers purchase a particular brand routinely, without conscious thought. They are a battleground for both the brand being purchased and competitors trying to influence with a stronger value proposition.

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References (1)
About the Author
Neil Kokemuller has been an active business, finance and education writer and content media website developer since 2007. He has been a college marketing professor since 2004. Kokemuller has additional professional experience in marketing, retail and small business. He holds a Master of Business Administration from Iowa State University.

Photo Credits
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18 Business Trends that Will Shape the World in 2018

18 Business Trends That Will Shape the World in 2018
These predictions will govern the business world in the upcoming year, and are followed by seven things your company can do to prepare.
by Marc Emmer Strategy and Strategic Planning Expert

After a year when the Dow, Nasdaq and U.S. GNP all demonstrated strong momentum, opportunities will abound in 2018*:

1. Entire industries will be reshaped by vertical mergers and acquisitions. Consolidationcontinues to be the agent of change in most industries. Recent acquisition announcements such as Amazon (Whole Foods), CVS (Aetna), and AT&T (Time Warner) demonstrate that companies are going vertical. Their next step will be to further consolidate suppliers, who need to provide greater capabilities.

2. After a weak 2017, the IPO market will rebound. According to Baker McKenzie, IPOs are expected to exceed $70 billion in value in 2018, buoyed by a strong stock market and tech sector.

3. The U.S. economy is surging, and renewed business confidence will drive growth. The WSJ/Vistage CEO Confidence Index, an indicator of small business confidence, rose 14 percent versus the prior year through October. 75 percent of those surveyed expect higher revenue in 2018 after a strong showing in 2017. 

4. Tax reform will be a boon for most entrepreneurs. Through the Congressional reconciliation process, the implications will become clearer, but the two proposals provide dramatic savings to pass-through entities that deploy capital. While professional services will see little tax benefit, CPAs, wealth advisors and financial services firms will have new opportunities to broker advice.

5. Leading American technology companies such as Google, Facebook and Amazon are facing “techlash” around the world. Shackled by controversies around censorship, privacy issues and data loss, tech giants are facing significant headwinds in China, Germany and elsewhere.

6. Immersive technologies explode onto the scene. 2018 will be the year that businesses deploy real-world applications of augmented reality (AR), and, to a lesser extent, virtual reality (VR). Already in use in many daily routines (such as the heads-up display in your car), augmented reality will be used to train machinists, pilots and retail employees.

7. IoT helps us make better decisions. According to Gartner there are already 8.4 billion “things”, and growing 30 percent every year. Companies are using IoT to accumulate data in real time.

8. Using artificial intelligence, bots will solve problems. For example, Facebook Messenger’s Woebot provides a daily chat and teaches behavior techniques to people who are depressed, or forgot to go to the gym. Business applications will abound.

9. Ecommerce reaches a tipping point. After a hot Black Friday and Cyber Monday, online sales are expected to grow a robust 20 percent in 2018. Amazon Prime is putting pressure on the entire industry to achieve next-day delivery. According to The Wall Street Journal, 8,600 stores will close in 2018.

10. Cryptocurrencies are no longer a fad. Bitcoin’s recent rise coincides with its listing on future exchanges where investors can hedge.

11. Here come the drones. The FAA will implement a new identification system to allow more precise monitoring, but also to enable more commercial applications.

12. Private sector space race reaches new heights. In 2018, a NASA aircraft will visit Mars while SpaceX, Virgin Galactic, Boeing and Blue Origin duke it out to provide opportunities for passengers to take a lap around the moon.

13. Tesla will sell half a million cars, paving the way for a new generation of zero-emissions vehicles. The new Model 3 offers true disruption in the form of a car that is fun to drive and affordable to the masses.

14. The great American housing imbalance constrains employment. As hot tech jobs migrate to urban centers like San Francisco and San Jose, millennials can’t afford to live in proximity to work. Even manufacturing workers often commute 60 minutes or more every day, putting more pressure on employers.

15. Employers will be more aware of harassment in the workplace. Companies will employ new practices and methods, reduce alcohol consumption and provide a safe harbor for employees to come forward.

16. Immigrant workers will be even harder to come by. The government is hiring over 10,000 ICE agents and shifting policy on H1B and L1 visas.

17. The pot business reaches new highs. When recreational marijuana becomes legal in California, Maine and Massachusetts, the market will effectively triple. New capital and entrepreneurs are flooding the market, but institutional investment is on the sidelines given the confusing federal, state and local oversight.

18. The global economy is still fragile. There is much to be optimistic about. But potential flashpoints in North Korea, China (rising debt), Venezuela (inflation over 1,000 percent) and Brazil (corruption), as well as threats of natural disaster and terrorism, put the world economy on tenuous footing.

Given these trends, what should your focus be in 2018?

  • Get great tax planning advice now, so you can act before the end of 2017.
  • Have a nimble strategic plan, that can change on a moment’s notice. Review it quarterly to ensure you are in a position to seize the opportunities ahead.
  • Invest in technology. Ask of your management team, how is technology a strategic advantage? If your team doesn’t have the chops to answer the question, find the people who do. Weave technology into your strategic plan.
  • Hire people before you need them. If the economy continues to heat up, and unemployment levels off at 4 percent or so, it’s going to be nearly impossible to find talent.
  • Be a best-in-class employer, and push the envelope on providing a flexible work environment (including virtual office space).
  • Utilize collaboration tools that allow you to provide your team the ability to be effective, in any location at any time.
  • Execute flawlessly. Given the rate of change, customers expect on-time delivery, great quality and seamless communication. Utilize agile principles to ensure your team can pivot quickly to meet evolving customer demands.

*Nothing in this post represents investment advice. 

This article was not written by James Hunter. This article was written by Marc Emmer, and shared directly from www.inc.com.

 

How to Help Prevent Heart Disease

You’re never too young— or too old — to take care of your heart.

Preventing heart disease (and all cardiovascular diseases) means making smart choices now that will pay off the rest of your life.

Lack of exercise, a poor diet and other unhealthy habits can take their toll over the years. Anyone at any age can benefit from simple steps to keep their heart healthy during each decade of life. Here’s how:

What You Can Do to Prevent Heart Disease

No matter what your age, everyone can benefit from a healthy diet and adequate physical activity.

  • Choose a healthy eating plan.  The food you eat can decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke.

    Choose foods low in saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium.  As part of a healthy diet, eat plenty of fruits and vegetablesfiber-rich whole grainsfish (preferably oily fish-at least twice per week), nuts, legumes and seeds and try eating some meals without meat.  Select lower fat dairy products and poultry (skinless).  Limit sugar-sweetened beverages and red meat. If you choose to eat meat, select the leanest cuts available.

  • Be physically active.  You can slowly work up to at least 2½ hours (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity (e.g., brisk walking) every week or 1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity (e.g., jogging, running) or a combination of both every week. Learn the American Heart Association’s Guidelines for Physical Activity in Adults and in Kids.

    Additionally, on 2 or more days a week you need muscle-strengthening activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest shoulders, and arms). Children should get at least 60 minutes of activity every day.

  • It’s never too early or too late to learn the warning signs of a heart attack and stroke. Not everyone experiences sudden numbness with a stroke or severe chest pain with a heart attack. And heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men.

 

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Get the scoop on “modern day recruiting” from a Secret Meeting…

Recently Ferny Ceballos was invited to speak at a secret meeting with top network marketing leaders.

What did Ferny talk about?

How to successfully build a network marketing business online TODAY.

You see, even though majority of highly respected old timers in our industry never admit this publicly, deep down inside they know this to be true…

Old school methods they’ve used to build their massive organizations with aren’t working as well anymore.

Including some of the social media tactics being taught today, which kinda worked a few years ago.

In this blog post, you’ll discover what Ferny revealed in this meeting about modern day prospecting and recruiting… and how it will effect the future of network marketing.

This email is from Elite Marketing Pro, and was not written by me. I may or may not earn commissions from products I promote in Elite Marketing Pro.

 

 

Passion or Problem? When Exercise Becomes an Addiction

Passion or Problem? When Exercise Becomes an Addiction

Greatist Op-Eds analyze what’s making headlines in fitness, health, and happiness. The thoughts expressed here are the author’s and don’t necessarily reflect Greatist’s outlook.

Photo: Bigstock

Let’s not beat around the fitness bush here. There’s no denying I’m legitimately addicted to exercise. Yet few people (myself included) fully understand this “healthy” mania that researchers estimateaffects 0.3 to 0.5 percent of the population.

 When I acknowledge the ridiculousness of my gym schedule to others, their response typically involves laughter followed by some variation of, “Gee, if I could have any addiction, I’d want it to be that one!” I usually smile politely and internally seethe. But even I can’t deny the element of hilarity in how out of control my daily routines have become.

The many iterations of my rigid fitness schedule — including but not limited to two hour-long sequences of the same set of yoga postures every single day, to a minimum 400 calorie burn on an elliptical machine, or a twenty-five-minute hike up a Stairmaster followed by a thirty-minute session on a Cybex climber — has quite literally controlled my life for the past ten years.

I’ve ended relationships, left jobs, lost friends, not gone on vacations, alienated family members, significantly pissed off fellow gym-goers, and sustained some seriously un-fun injuries. And it’s all in the obsessive-compulsive interest of off-setting a neurotic hunch that my entire world will implode if I don’t complete some outlandish routine seven times a week, if not more.

How Healthy Becomes Harmful

Addict or not, exercise undeniably makes everyone feel better. Just ten minutes of physical exertion has been shown to reduce depression, improve our mood, dial down anxiety, make us less angry, relieve bodily aches and pains, and reduce mortality .

Improved physical strength, endurance, and a tighter waistline are additional pros of getting our gym on. And then there’s the ego-stroking thrill of broadcasting our fitness achievements via the web, around the office, or even over a few drinks with friends.

There’s nothing wrong with incorporating these dollops of “fit-spiration” into our daily decisions to be active. But problems arise when the pursuit of these awesome payoffs starts taking over our lives.

Exercise addiction often starts as a peer-encouraged means of achieving a happier state: It wards off tension A meta-analysis on the anxiety-reducing effect of acute and chronic exercise: outcomes and mechanisms. Petruzzello, S.J., Landers, A.C., Hatfield, B.D., et al. Sports Medicine, 1991. 11:143–182.. It dampens the impact of stresses at work or school. It takes the edge off self-consciousness. Or it kicks off that runner’s high, which makes you seriously think you just might be super(wo)man.

Gradually, these benefits become increasingly difficult to obtain from the initial amount of exercise you first engaged in. You begin avoiding other ways to manage icky emotions, feel okay about yourself, or find the motivation to work towards non-fitness goals.

Next thing you know, you’re regularly cancelling plans with friends to stay longer at the gym. The concept of taking a day off makes you want to cry, and you’re devoting so much mental energy to planning your next workout that your job performance is waning. You’re not sleeping well, your temper’s grown astonishingly short, and you’re desperately trying to ignore the achy requests from your body to chill the f*** out.

Meanwhile, everyone’s telling you, you look UH-mazing!!!

“When you start to lose control over a behavior — when you find yourself routinely exceeding a pre-planned limit or repeatedly spending longer than you intended doing it — that’s a key sign you’re addicted,” explains Marilyn Freimuth, Ph.D., psychologist and author of Addicted? Recognizing Destructive Behavior Before It’s Too Late. Not taking enough time off to heal injuries and being unable to keep exercise out of your mind during non-fitness engagements are additional signs the behavior is bordering on unhealthy.

Other indicators? Feeling guilty about how much you exercise, craving more and more exercise to achieve its initial effects, and attempting to exercise in the same way or at the same frequency day after day after day.

To make sense of it all, exercise psychologists Heather Hausenblas, Ph.D., (a Greatist Expert) and Danielle Symons Downs, Ph.D., designed an Exercise Dependence Scale to assess individuals’ risks for exercise addiction. Modeled after the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorder’s protocol for identifying substance addictions, Hausenblas and Symons Downs’s “EDS” weighs seven factors:

  1. Tolerance: Needing more and more of the activity to achieve its initial effects.
  2. Withdrawal: Increased agitation, fatigue, and tension when not exercising.
  3. “Intention Effect”: Exercising for longer than intended on most trips to the gym.
  4. Lack of control: Difficulty scaling back the duration and intensity of exercise.
  5. Time Spent”: Funneling exorbitant chunks of our day and night towards fitness-related activities.
  6. Reduction of Other Pursuits: Avoidance of social engagements that don’t involve exercise, cancelling plans, or showing up late for work in order to exercise longer.
  7. Continuance Despite Injury: Not taking enough time off to heal despite your doctor repeatedly raising judgmental eyebrows.

(Curious readers may also want to refer to the Exercise Addiction Inventory, a shorter assessment tool designed by sports psychologist Mark Griffiths, Ph.D., that some experts believe is easier to administer.)

I am sharing a portion of this article on my website here. You can read the original and FULL article when you follow the link –https://greatist.com/fitness/exercise-addiction.

 

Top 10 Fitness Trends You’ll See Everywhere This Year

The Top 10 Fitness Trends You’ll See Everywhere This Year

From HIIT to yoga, here’s what the fitness pros are eyeing in 2018

 JANUARY 4, 2018
Getty Images
Fitness trends come and go every year, but we’re going back to the basics in 2018, according to a new annual survey from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) published in its Health & Fitness Journal.

For the survey, the authors identified 40 possible fitness trends for 2018 and asked more than 4,000 fitness pros from organizations like the American Council on Exercise and the National Council on Strength and Fitness to rank them on a 10-point scale, with 10 meaning it was most likely to be a trend this year.

The ACSM also distinguished the difference between a trend and fad in the survey. A trend was defined as having more lasting power than a fad, which is typically met with more enthusiasm but lasts for a shorter amount of time.

With that, here’s what you should know about the 10 fitness trends you’ll see everywhere this year.

The Top 10 Fitness Trends of 2018

FITNESS TREND FOR 2018: HIGH INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING

Looks like 2018 is going to be sweaty. A high intensity interval training (HIIT) session usually only lasts 30 minutes or less, but requires short bursts of (you guessed it) high intensity exercise followed by a slower-paced recovery period. For instance, you might sprint as hard as you can for 15 to 30 seconds and then walk for 45 to 60 seconds. You’d alternate between the two for a set amount of time.

There’s a reason people can’t get enough of it: The workouts are time efficient and effective if you’re looking to fry fat, research suggests.

One catch, though. Fitness pros don’t love recommending HIIT to their clients, since it has a higher rate of injury, according to the ACSM. Here’s the smartest way to do HIIT if you want to give it a go.

You can read the full article when you follow this link-https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/top-fitness-trends-2018/slide/1.

 

Tech Trends for 2018

Top 10 Tech Trends For 2018

 Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

As Nostradamuses everywhere whip out their crystal balls and begin their annual exercise, predicting the next Big Idea/Theme for 2018, we’re going to give you our Top 10 predictions, based on an entirely more rigorous and systematic approach.

Every year, an interdisciplinary team of futurists, analysts and consultants in Frost & Sullivan’s Visionary Innovation Group takes a pause from looking at 10-year horizons, and comes together to identify the trends that will make the biggest impact in the coming year.

So how did we score with our predictions for 2017? We hit a bull’s eye with our assertions regarding Data-as-a-Service, Connected Living, the AI Personal Assistant Race, Cognitive is the New Smart, and the Industrial IOT Ecosystem play. (Confession: We were not, alas, as successful in our predictions about what the current U.S. administration would say or do!)

2017 saw major advances in the Smart Home space that both our Connected Living and AI Personal Assistant predictions addressed. Google launched a smart home system, as we predicted, and smart home systems saw major leaps in terms of adoption and capabilities.

Data-as-a-Service was a huge theme for the year, one in which we saw strong interest from industries ranging from health wearables and auto manufacturers, to industrial solution providers. The conversation around how to take advantage of data you already own, and develop products that will generate increasing volumes of valuable data, markedly gained in intensity over the last year. This also closely tied into our theme of Cognitive is the New Smart, with all of this data serving as the foundation for AI capabilities.

One trend in which our outlier prediction prevailed over traditional expectations was about the trend of increasing insularity, nationalism and protectionism. At the end of 2016, it looked as though countries around the world were poised to turn inward and retreat from the global stage. While that did happen in isolated cases, for the most part voters (just about) rejected this continued sentiment in major elections in France, Germany and the Netherlands.

As we look to 2018, we see several common themes emerging: the rapidly growing and transformational nature of technology continues to dominate the conversation, but we can expect it to be paralleled by an increasingly passionate debate about the extent and degree of government and regulatory influence aimed at mitigating the growing power of technology. This will gain momentum as leading tech companies race toward a trillion dollar valuation, and scrutiny of and protection against misinformation and hacking increases. Further in the technology space, we can also expect to see the emergence of themes that were regarded as the preserve of science fiction, such as the testing of flying cars (truly, back to the future!) and the emergence of quantum supremacy. Less tech-focused themes include the rise of a new generation of political leaders and the growing adoption of behavioural science by enterprises, with a focus on optimising both employee productivity and consumer purchase patterns.

The Trillion-Dollar Sprint

2018 is likely to be the year that a leading Fortune 500 company (think tech titans Apple, Google, Microsoft or Amazon, with petroleum giant Saudi Aramco crashing the tech party) surpasses the trillion dollar valuation mark. The trillion-dollar question is which corporate behemoth will be the first to claim this bragging right? Attainment of this benchmark will highlight a new level of corporate power and influence but will also result in closer monitoring by competitors, regulators and consumers. These companies might become trillion dollar babies but key for them will be earning and retaining public trust the world over.

The Innovation Tug-of-War

Rising concerns regarding technology companies’ increasing power is driving pushback from government organizations, and we expect this trend to gain momentum in 2018. Greater government and regulatory oversight is likely to protect consumers and curb corporate overreach, but may also stunt innovation. Underscoring this trend will be the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into effect in mid-2018, as well as adjusted net neutrality rules in the US.

The Quantum Leap

Long the domain of science fiction and theory, quantum computing looks poised to outperform traditional supercomputers and achieve supremacy in 2018. Competitors in the space are aggressively racing to increase their qubit computing power, while minimizing the potential for errors. Experimentation of quantum computing in conjunction with encryption, AI, materials, and qubit generation will be key areas of focus in 2018. Be ready to hear “Quantum” as the next buzz word.

Flying Cars Reach for the Skies

Get ready to throw out the conventional road safety rule book. You might not have to check skywards just yet when you cross the road, but flying cars are getting ready to ruffle some feathers (and it’s not just birds we are talking about!). Numerous competitors laid the groundwork in 2017, testing their flying vehicle models, with more expected in 2018. The biggest leap forward in this space, and in the public’s popular imagination, will be the much anticipated launch of a flying taxi service in Dubai this summer. Expect more buzz worthy investments as awareness becomes more widespread.

Companies Listen In for Lucre

Fears over tech companies eavesdropping on consumer conversations have been inflamed with the rising adoption of Smart Home devices and AI Personal Assistants. This will be a hot button topic as capabilities and past incidents signal the high likelihood of conversations being illegally tapped. Gear up for intensified media scrutiny along with consumer and regulatory pushback in 2018.

Debunking the Fabricated

It’s not as if fake news is a novel idea. But, it hogged the headlines in 2017 as fact and fiction got completely tangled (or, do we mean mangled?). Governments, industry participants and citizen-focused initiatives are already coming together to identify, reduce and prevent misinformation strategies and fake news in 2018. In light of recent incidents, the focus will be on quelling interference in political processes and social polarization efforts. Developments may lead to the segmentation of social media based on verified identities, pseudonyms, and anonymous environments.

Embracing the Rise of Enterprise Behavioural Science

We expect to see 2018 as the year that behavioural science takes hold in the enterprise, with savvy companies embracing these economic and social science principles to increase worker productivity and nudge consumers towards desirable outcomes. Media attention on early adopters and Nobel Prize recognition of the discipline’s founder will prompt growing adoption in 2018. Brace yourself for a flurry of behavioural science consultancies, as well as more behavioral scientists in HR, strategy, and marketing positions.

Brand Youth as Politics Undergoes a Generational Shift

Justin Trudeau is perhaps the most recognizable among a new generation of political leaders from around the world—New Zealand to North Korea, and Austria to Saudi Arabia—who are redefining politics as usual. While some of these new leaders champion political views stereotypical of their generation, others have veered towards more conventional ideas. The emergence of these young leaders marks a watershed: it will signal either a rising tide of millennial leaders, or will relegate these early entrants to a short-lived experiment with change.

Managing Global Natural Disaster Strategies

Hurricanes, mudslides, earthquakes and floods battered the world with unprecedented frequency and ferocity in 2017. As the social and economic toll mounts, prepare for consortiums of businesses, municipalities and insurance companies working together in 2018 to take more aggressive steps and employ innovative strategies to minimize the impact of these natural disasters.

Platform-Only Business Models Cede Ground

In 2017, we saw some interesting developments at the world’s most notable platforms, Uber and AirBnB, which indicated a move beyond platform-only business models and into acquisition and partnership with asset providers. This underlined a need to differentiate and overcome some of the challenges that a platform-only model presents, with the objective of increasing the value of both digital and physical assets.

So that’s our list of top 10 big, bold predictions for 2018. And we’ll check back in a year’s time to see how we did.

This article was written with contributions from Lauren Taylor, a Principal Consultant in the Visionary Innovation Group at Frost & Sullivan, as well as the global Visionary Innovation Group at Frost & Sullivan. Research and analysis is developed in greater detail in the forthcoming “Top Trends for 2018” study.

You can read the original article on www.forbes.com.

Calling it a Dip-This Week in Cryptocurrency

This Week in Cryptocurrency – February 9th, 2018

The Grass is Always Greener on the Other Side of a Dip

Calling it a dip doesn’t really do it justice.  Even calling what we’ve experienced over the last month a correction seems to be in bad humor. How else do we justify crypto’s overall market cap going from $834bln at its peak in January to $282bln at its lowest point?  By holding on with iron hands, that’s how.

Now, we don’t know if it’s over yet, no matter how much we’re praying for the worst to be behind us. That said, the market is looking healthier than it has in a hot minute, and a top 10 smiling with green is something to be thankful for.

Bitcoin: Bitcoin has seen better days, that’s for sure, but all things considered, it’s doing pretty well.  Well, technically it’s still down 2% from this time last week.  But I think we can all agree that $8,400 is a lot better than the $6,000 rock bottom Bitcoin hit earlier in the week during the sell-off.

Ethereum: It looks like the marketcap’s runner up is in the exact same boat as Bitcoin.  Ethereum is also down 2% from its starting point last Friday, currently sitting with a price of $854.

Ripple: Ripple breaks the mold Bitcoin/Ethereum set, though, as it is currently up 6% from this time last week.  This is largely the result of some upwards price action last night that puled it up to $0.90.

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Honorable Mentions: No honorable mentions this week, as no coin has done much worth mentioning (except E-coin, which is reloading for its second pump-n-dump of the week, up 1,855% in 24/hrs).  No, we don’t have any legit honorable mentions, but rather, an honorable coincidence.  As u/steelflight84 pointed out on r/cryptocurrency earlier this week, Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Ripple followed closely at each other’s heels during this week’s downwards race.  So closely, in fact, that their prices mirrored each other by powers of 10.

Domestic News:

Forbes Gives Enthusiasts the Chance to Stalk Their Favorite Crypto Fat Cats: So stalk might be a strong word.  Regardless, Forbes has released the first ever “Richest People in Cryptocurrency,” the digital economy equivalent of of the “World’s Billionaire List.”  Topping the list include such figures as Ripple’s former CEO Chris Larsen and Binance founder Changpeng Zhao.

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SEC/CFTC Senate Testimony Gives Crypto Hope (and a New Mascot): Jay Clayton and Chris Giancarlo made the case for regulating cryptocurrencies before the Senate on Tuesday.  The meeting ended on a positive note, as legislators seemed open to the courses of action both the SEC/CFTC heads suggested.  This gave investors and enthusiasts alike a glint of optimism for the future of the space in a time when the market’s crash was leaving many in despair.  Giancarlo, who even told senators about the wonders of HODLing, left the meeting looking somewhat like a mascot for the crypto-sphere, and community members thanked him for his cheerleading by increasing his Twitter followers from 5k to 28.5k in under 48 hours.

Bittrex Turns Up the Heat on Coinbase, Looks to Add USD Deposits: First Robinhood announced that it would open cryptocurrency trading, and now Bittrex has announced that it will integrate USD deposits, while also opening up new accounts to welcome fresh users.  Should Coinbase be worried?  Like Bitcoin, it has first mover advantage, but it’s starting to see some competition enter the fiat-to-crypto marketplace.

Once Again, Goldman Sachs Says Most Coins Will Soon Be Worthless: Head of Global Investment Research Steve Strongin isn’t saying all coins won’t make it in the long run, but he is saying that most digital assets in their current form are worthless. In a “few-winners-take-most” market, blockchain technology will survive while  “the currencies that don’t survive will most likely trade to zero.”

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Credit Cards Companies Try to Fight the Rise of Crypto with Purchase Bans: Big banks like Bank of America and J.P. Morgan are starting to block purchases from known cryptocurrency exchanges like Coinbase. While the J.P. Morgan’s spokesperson Mary Jane Rogers says that the risk associated with cryptocurrencies is too high right now, it makes us wonder if the ban is an attempt to combat the success and rise of its competition.

You Can Now Buy GPU’s For Crypto Mining on Amazon: If you were wondering where to purchase your first mining rig, look no further…Amazon is now offering miners the ability to score their very own GPU through third-party vendor sales. If you’re looking for a bargain, you can even buy a 6-pack of cold-hard GPU’s (that is, until they overheat). Prices for these tools have skyrocketed in the past three months, moving from the low $200s to nearly triple this price.

Ohio Teen Becomes Millionaire After Purchasing Crypto With Entire Life Savings“I thought: ‘Wow, I just made a 10% return in a day. That’s crazy,’” said 18-year-old Eddy Zillan in an interview with Business Insider. Zillan started purchasing crypto at the young age of 15, 3 years beneath the required age to open a Coinbase account. But that didnt stop this opportune crpyto kid from joining in on the action, who now charges up to $250 an hour for his advising services.

California Crypto Enthusiasts Find New-Found Freedom in Puerto Rico: Living in a building they named “Sol”, a bunch of Californians moved to the Caribbean island not for its beauty, but to avoid capital gains taxes and federal taxes. Their goal is to establish a “cryptotopia” in the heart of the territory’s capital, San Juan, and they’re even saying that the government is allowing them to set up a cryptocurrency bank. Founder of Halsey Minor says while the hurricanes that wrecked Puerto Rico were awful, the low property costs and companies moving their headquarters to Puerto Rico is a “godsend” in the long-term.


What’s New at CoinCentral?

Behind the Scenes of Cryptocurrency Exchanges: Ever wanted to know more about of the secrets and strategies utilized by the world’s leading exchanges? Here, we highlight some of the insights gained at the 2018 Blockchain Connect Conference in San Francisco.

Off to the Races: The competition for the most popular decentralized exchange is underway, and we’ve compiled a list of the more popular DEXs out there so you can take your pick of the litter.

KuCoin Exchange Review: How does the KuCoin trading platform stack up against competitors? We’ll tell you.

NEO’s New Vision: The Moonshot: NEO DevCon brought together blockchain enthusiasts, developers, investors, and entrepreneurs from all around the world into an intimate environment teaming with information and enthusiasm. Come join us in learning more about what the NEO team envisions and where its going in the future.

What is Status (SNT)?: Want to know more about this mobile client reimagining the social network? Search no further.

What is Zilliqa?: This guide takes an in-depth look at a blockchain with a high-scalability solution.

What is MaidSafeCoin?: While the SAFE network is still in its infancy, its clear the many possible benefits that can occur through the project’s mission. Learn more about this game changing technology in this article.

Cryptocurrency Industry Spotlight: Tim Draper: A long-time advocate of Bitcoin and blockchain technology, Draper has attracted significant attention to himself and his activity in the cryptocurrency world. Find out more about this venture capitalist and prominent figure in the blockchain world in this industry spotlight. Draper University also launched a Blockchain Intensive course tailored around Draper’s and his network’s insights.

Growing the Blockchain Community was a Big Topic at NEO DevCon: In this article, we take a look at some of the biggest themes coming out of NEO’s DevCon in terms of growing the blockchain community.

You can find the original publication when you follow this link-https://coincentral.com/week-cryptocurrency-february-9th-2018/.

Crypto News on Peter Saddington

Crypto News Update – Feb 8, 2018

Crypto-millionaire Buys $115 Lamborghini

A 35-year-old coder named Peter Saddington used Bitcoin’s full potential after purchasing a 2015 Lamborghini Huracan worth $200,000. Interestingly, he paid 45 Bitcoins to get the luxury sports car.

BTC is equivalent to $8,200 at the moment of writing. But Saddington’s 45 Bitcoins cost him only $115 when he bought them in 2011. He adds that he has been buying Bitcoins every Friday over the last five years, making him a full-fledged “Hodler,” the community’s term for long-term crypto holders.

Forbes Releases List of Top Cryptocurrency Billionaires

Forbes is best known for its list of top billionaires. But it recently created an entirely new roster featuring the richest people in the world of cryptocurrency. Two of the most popular people on the list are the Winklevoss twins, who are currently worth around $1 billion.

There’s also Vitalik Buterin, the creator of Ethereum, who is valued at around $450 million, and Coinbase founder Brian Armstrong who has an estimated value of $1 billion. The list includes 19 people who have over $350 million of estimated net worth.

An interesting thing about this list is its average age of 42, which is a far cry from the 67-year-old average age of Forbes 400 wealthiest Americans. Perhaps the crypto world is for the young generation, eh?

Bitcoin Value Will Increase 40x, Says Winklevoss

Gemini Exchange co-founder Cameron Winklevoss is confident that Bitcoin’s value will increase by 30 to 40 times. This is after the cryptocurrency’s price swiftly recovered from the slump it had over the past weeks.

Winklevoss believes that Bitcoin is more valuable than gold because its supply amount is fixed, unlike the latter which has an unknown supply. He adds that Bitcoin is also more durable and portable, making it the ideal currency of the in the near future.

Bitcoin’s ‘Rainbow After the Storm’ Evident

Investors thought that Bitcoin’s “bubble” was already bursting — until yesterday.  The cryptocurrency’s value plunged to its lowest point over the last three months as it sat around the $6,000-mark on Feb. 6.

Surprisingly, the trend swiftly changed and it rose to $8,400 within just 24 hours. At the moment of writing, 1 BTC is equivalent to $8,200, which is 25% higher than yesterday.

However, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are very volatile, making them a somewhat unstable form of investment. Nonetheless, optimists don’t seem to mind as more people are starting to buy into the “hype” once again.

Steve Wozniack’s Bitcoins Sold, Says He Doesn’t Want to Worry

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has just sold all of his Bitcoins in hopes of getting rid of the “stressful matter.” Wozniak started investing in Bitcoin when it hovered around the $700-mark.

But he decided to let go of his experimental investment due to the volatility. He even finds it to be too worrisome — so he got rid of it. Despite that, there’s no doubt that he made a small fortune in exchange for his worry.

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Jomar Teves

A content writer by day, a tech enthusiast by night. After 4 years in business school & working for multinational clients, Jomar believes he can improve the world through his writings.